Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Rangefinder shootout

  1. #1

    Rangefinder shootout

    How does your rangefinder "stack up"?

  2. #2
    Thanks for the review!! I really enjoyed reading it. It was well done. For those that aren't on facebook!!

    Rangefinder Fightout SigSauer Kilo2000

    One of the most important tools a marksman can have in his bag, is a good rangefinder. When I first started shooting, I didn't have the money to buy one, neither did I have the sense to. Interesting how something seemingly insignificant would soon become indispensable. I figured a lot of these things out the hard way, the stupid way you could even say. Despite my hardheaded approach to distance shooting, I got pretty good at estimating range. A skill that was later confirmed by the rangefinder that had done without far too long.
    By the time I finally purchased a laser rangefinder, I had at least gained enough smarts to recognize what I needed.
    My first purchase was a Leica 1200, a good piece of equipment that served me very well. I quickly learned as I played with other rangefinders that good ones usually reach beyond their limits. While lower end units, wouldn't even reach advertised distances.
    As my skills matured, and distances became longer, I out grew that old Leica, and it's since been replaced by a newer CRF model. I also stepped up to a Swarovski Laserguide, as with my Leica, the Swarovski reached well beyond its advertised envelope, reaching to 1800+ yards in the right conditions.
    These tools have sharpened this shooters abilities, through day to day use, and confirming estimations.
    Well, I was recently handed one of the new Sig Sauer Kilo 2000 rangefinders. I have heard many good things about this new line of optics from Sig. And this Kilo seemed like a big winner.
    With an advertised range of 3400yds (reflective) I was very optimistic. In my opinion, it fell into that price range where rangefinders always underperformed. But even so I thought, if it reaches half what they advertise, it'd be worth the money.
    I quickly made my way to my Rocky Mountain haunt, to put the Kilo against my Leica CRF1200, and my Swarovski Laserguide.
    I'm a simple guy, I don't care much for bells and whistles. So though the Kilo features an angle adjusted range, I switched it to simple range only. I can do field math, I like whole numbers, and percentages. I don't need my optics to do it for me. Plus I like to know exactly what I'm getting into.
    A quick run through the various rock piles in my cold and snowy canyon would tell me how well the Kilo measured up.
    At the quarter mile mark, all three rangefinders barely broke a sweat. My first impression of the Kilo was how fast it returned with a reading. Faster than my Leica, and twice the speed of the Swarovski. "This will triple the speed at which I miss my targets." I thought to myself, "better slow down".
    I soon noticed a slight difference in color while looking through the Kilo, a bluish hue that was quite apparent (see pics). This is certainly not a big deal, at least to me. It was certainly lighter as well, easily placed in a pocket to be carried. The optical field of view looking through the Kilo was almost exactly the same as my CRF1200, the quality was comparable as well. Both of them were narrow compared to the Laserguide, which also had a better image I might add. But for twice the price of the others, it ought to.
    I pushed all three RF's one after another out to 1050yds, all three of them working flawlessly. And returning ranges to within +/-1 or 2 yards. Perfectly acceptable for a guy who's targets are +/-2 or 3 yards wide right?
    Up to this point I had to say I was pretty happy about the results. Simply because For most people I know, a good rangefinder that will reliably hit 1,000yds plus and cost under 500$ is a pretty good deal.
    Well I had to push them further. The sunlight was fading somewhat as it hid behind the evening clouds to the west. I thought surely I could push the Kilo further, but to my surprise I couldn't get it to read on anything further out.
    I thought that perhaps maybe this Kilo couldn't hang with my "higher end" RF's. So I pulled out my Leica, and the Top hat it came with, and tried to hit the same rock. To my surprise, it wouldn't read either. I suppose the light and conditions weren't good enough for either RF to read. But before I put shame upon the two smaller units, I figured I'd check to see how the Swarovski would fair.
    Sure enough, as usual, the Laserguide came through. Showing 1300yds. My suspicions about light angles and conditions were confirmed, as my Swarovski would reach no further in the cold quiet canyon. Leaving me scratching my head.
    Further testing is warranted, and no doubt I will get more info. I'd like to see how far this Kilo will really go, I am skeptical that it will actually reach advertised distances due to my experiences, as well as those of others. None the less, I am very impressed that Sig has produced this RF for less than 500$ and that easily hits to 1000 yards and beyond. If I could go back to the beginning of my shooting career and sell myself this Kilo, it may have been one of the best purchases made.
    I won't be replacing my Swarovski anytime soon, but if I was in the market for a new rangefinder, for hunting, or practical shooting, the Kilo 2000 would be top contender.

  3. #3
    Prophet River was selling these rangefinders for $650 Canadian. I have a Swarovski I bought about 7 years ago now that does the job or I would have bought one of the Sig Kilo 2000 units. Mine was a demo sale from when our dollar was at par so it was a good deal. But these new Sig ones look to be a very good deal.

    What was the battery drain like vs the other range finders? Just wondering what battery life is like with these.
    Last edited by Full Metal Jacket; 06-21-2016 at 03:15 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts